The objective of Ind AS 16 is to prescribe the accounting treatment for property, plant and equipment so that users of the financial statements can discern information about an entity’s investment in its property, plant and equipment and the changes in such investment. The principal issues in accounting for property, plant and equipment are the recognition of the assets, the determination of their carrying amounts and the depreciation charges and impairment losses to be recognised in relation to them.

Property, plant and equipment are tangible items that:

(a) are held for use in the production or supply of goods or services, for rental to others, or for administrative purposes; and
(b) are expected to be used during more than one period. The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment should be recognised as an asset if, and only if:
(a) it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the entity; and
(b) the cost of the item can be measured reliably.

Entities accounting for investment property in accordance with Ind AS 40, Investment Property are required to use the cost model in this Standard. Items such as spare parts, stand-by equipment and servicing equipment are
recognised in accordance with this Ind AS when they meet the definition of property, plant and equipment. Otherwise, such items are classified as inventory

Measurement at Recognition

An item of property, plant and equipment that qualifies for recognition as an asset should be measured at its cost.
The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment is the cash price equivalent at the recognition date. If payment is deferred beyond normal credit terms, the difference between the cash price equivalent and the total payment is recognised as interest over the period of credit unless such interest is capitalised in accordance with Ind AS 23.

The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment should comprises:

(a) its purchase price, including import duties and non-refundable purchase taxes, after deducting trade discounts and rebates.
(b) any costs directly attributable to bringing the asset to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management.
(c) the initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located, the obligation for which an entity incurs either when the item is acquired or as a consequence of having used the item during a particular period for purposes other than to produce inventories during that period.

Measurement after Recognition

An entity should choose either the cost model or the revaluation model as its accounting policy and apply that policy to an entire class of property, plant and equipment.

Cost Model

After recognition as an asset, an item of property, plant and equipment should be carried at its cost less any accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses.

Revaluation Model

After recognition as an asset, an item of property, plant and equipment whose fair value can be measured reliably should be carried at a revalued amount, being its fair value at the date of the revaluation less any subsequent
accumulated depreciation and subsequent accumulated impairment losses. Revaluations should be made with sufficient regularity to ensure that the carrying amount does not differ materially from that which would be determined using fair value at the end of the reporting period.

If an asset’s carrying amount is increased as a result of a revaluation, the increase should be recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated in equity under the heading of revaluation surplus. However, the increase should be recognised in profit or loss to the extent that it reverses a revaluation decrease of the same asset previously recognised in profit or loss.

If an asset’s carrying amount is decreased as a result of a revaluation, the decrease should be recognised in profit or loss. However, the decrease shall be recognised in other comprehensive income to the extent of any credit balance existing in the revaluation surplus in respect of that asset. The decrease recognised in other comprehensive income reduces the amount accumulated in equity under the heading of revaluation surplus.

Depreciation

Each part of an item of property, plant and equipment with a cost that is significant in relation to the total cost of the item should be depreciated separately. The depreciation charge for each period should be recognised in profit or loss unless it is included in the carrying amount of another asset. Each part of an item of property, plant and equipment with a cost that is significant in relation to the total cost of the item shall be depreciated separately.
The depreciable amount of an asset should be allocated on a systematic basis over its useful life. The depreciable amount of an asset should be determined after deducting its residual value. The depreciation method used shall reflect the pattern in which the asset’s future economic benefits are expected to be
consumed by the entity.

The residual value and the useful life of an asset should be reviewed at least at each financial year-end and, if expectations differ from previous estimates, the change(s) should be accounted for as a change in an accounting estimate in accordance with Ind AS 8, Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors.

Land and buildings are separable assets and should be accounted for separately, even when they are acquired together. With some exceptions, such as quarries and sites used for landfill, land has an unlimited useful life and
therefore is not depreciated. Buildings have a limited useful life and therefore are depreciable assets. An increase in the value of the land on which a building stands does not affect the determination of the depreciable amount of the building.

Impairment

To determine whether an item of property, plant and equipment is impaired, an entity should apply Ind AS 36, Impairment of Assets.

Derecognition

The carrying amount of an item of property, plant and equipment should be derecognised:

(a) on disposal; or
(b) when no future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Appendix B to Ind AS 16 provides guidance for recognition of production stripping costs as an asset; initial measurement of the stripping activity asset; and subsequent measurement of the stripping activity asset. An entity shall recognise a stripping activity asset if, and only if, (a) it is probable that the future economic benefit (improved access to the ore body) associated with the stripping activity will flow to the entity; (b) the entity can identify the component of the ore body for which access has been improved; and (c) the costs relating to the stripping activity associated with that component can be measured reliably. The entity shall initially measure the stripping activity asset at cost. After initial recognition, the stripping activity asset shall be carried at either its cost or its revalued amount less depreciation or amortisation and less impairment losses, in the same way as the existing asset of which it is a part.

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